Category: General Health and Safety

Helping Kids Deal with Bullies

Now that the school year has officially begun, some children may have a hard time adjusting to old social constructs after three long months of little to no interaction with so many peers on a regular basis. Being pushed around or teased by an older sibling is a completely different story than another student on the playground doing it. It can make the child feel threatened, unsafe, angry, and cause anxiety at the prospect of even going to school.

25% of public schools in the U.S. report that bullying happens on a daily if not weekly basis. Many children can be scared to admit when they are being bullied. This can be due to embarrassment, fear parents or teachers will not believe them, or that the bullying will get worse if the bully is provoked by getting punished for his actions.

How to Recognize the Signs

If your child is not telling you outright that he or she is being bullied, here are ways to identify it if you suspect it may be happening. Every situation is different, but a victim of bullying can be spotted if you know what to look for.

Not Eating

Anxiety can often cause loss of appetite, which can in turn lead to moodiness and fatigue. If your child is wanting to eat less or even skip meals altogether, they could be very anxious.

Evasiveness

Very few kids are truly bouncing off the walls to go to school every day. If you notice that your child is dragging their feet more than usual, or even trying to make excuses to get out of going to school (feigning sickness, intentionally missing the bus, etc), there could be something deeper than just simply not wanting to go.

Acting Out

If you find your child is being unusually harsh towards you or their siblings, and perhaps exhibiting out-of-character behavior, there is a chance they are reacting from being hurt – either physically, emotionally, or mentally, by someone they must face each day. Going to school five days a week can feel like a full-blown battle for them if this is occurring. This can force the need for them to put up a proverbial wall to guard themselves as a defense mechanism.

Remember that unprovoked cruelty, violence, foul language, name-calling, and extreme rudeness are often learned behaviors. If you aren’t teaching your kids this, they could be learning from somewhere else – i.e., from the bully or bullies that are mistreating them. Children who stand out as disobedient and disruptive are usually those that are not receiving the attention that they need.Two young girls bullying other young girl outdoors

How to Respond

If you are noticing any or all of these behaviors, approach your child in a gentle and casual manner. Sometimes asking a blatant question is not enough. A way to do this would be to perhaps tell a story of how you or a family member was bullied as a kid. This makes it feel like a conversation rather than an interrogation and may help you get to the bottom of what is happening.

If and when your child has expressed to you any of their struggles, first thank them for telling you and praise them for having the courage to say something. Contact the school counselor about their bullying policies; there is a chance that they have ways to monitor certain kids closely before disciplinary action is taken. This at least makes them aware of the situation, and helps you work together as a team instead of taking the situation into your own hands – like contacting the bully’s parents directly, you “dealing” with the bully yourself, etc. Chances are, your child is not the only victim.

How to Reconcile

The common phrase of responding to bullies is often: “Stand up to them!” Depending on your parenting style and moral leanings this can look different for everyone. Most parents will give their child permission to physically fight back and defend themselves if a bully is violent. Many say that by a simple retaliation it allows a bully to “get a taste of their own medicine.”

Some parents are more pacifistic in approaching these conflicts and will teach their child to respond in non-physical ways. In verbal fights, this could mean just saying something like, “knock it off,” “please stop,” or saying nothing at all and walking away.

To avoid bullies, teach your children the value of utilizing the buddy system. When a child is alone and isolated they can be singled out quicker and become easier to corner. This means having at least one friend accompany them to their locker, the bathroom, sitting on the bus or in the hallways – basically anywhere where authority is not constantly present.

Although, many bullies will back off if they are simply ignored. The rise they can get out of someone else may be the only gratification they seek. If a bully receives no reaction from a victim at all, the need to tease and fight is lost. However, this concept can be difficult to grasp for a lot of children, as when we are provoked defense is the natural response. It may help if there is some practice role-playing that takes place between you and your child. For example, say something to the effect of, “If ____ teases you on the playground tomorrow, what are you going to do?” These discussions can stay with the child throughout their day and help them remember what to do when they are put in certain scenarios.
Strong child with muscles drawn on chalkboard in elementary school
Each victim, parent, school, and overall situation is different, so in the event of bullying there is no one-size-fits-all answer. Whatever the case may be, bullying is not to be disregarded as something that builds character (even if this is the end result). Negativity only breeds negativity. While sure, children should learn the value of  “sticks and stones” in terms of developing thicker skin, there is something about a child feeling unsafe in an environment they spend the most time in that should not be ignored. Where the character-building comes from is the confidence you place in your child no matter what; and the safety and comfort they can receive from you even in the face of adversity.

Bad Breath – How it Happens & How You Can Stop It
Bad Breath – How it Happens & How You Can Stop It

We have all been in this situation: we are deep in a discussion with a friend, family member, co-worker, etc, and a ghastly smell wafts from their mouth. Once the smell is detected, it is hard to continue the conversation! Bad breath plagues on average 65% of Americans. For the individual in question it can be a truly embarrassing condition, and even create a fear of speaking aloud if there are no breath mints or chewing gum on hand.

In general, all bad breath is caused by an accumulation of bacteria in the mouth that is not properly removed. To contrast this idea, a similar bodily process can be found in sweat. Sweating is our body’s way of cooling us off and releasing toxins. However, when sweat is not washed off properly by bathing, it can begin to smell, and become what is known as “B.O.” or “body odor”. Inside our mouths, salivating has a similar purpose. Saliva glands in our mouths are used to wash away bacteria and continually replenish the mouth. Yet when proper oral hygiene is neglected, bacteria can flourish and the mouth can produce a nasty odor.

The Three Types of Bad Breath

1. Eating Those Potent Foods

The most obvious type of bad breath is the type that is completely situational, and that is whenever we eat something with a strong taste. Foods like garlic, onions, coffee, and certain spice-laden meals can seemingly cling to every inch of our mouths after eating them.
Luckily, a quick rinse with mouthwash or a teeth brushing can eliminate these odors fairly quickly after the fact.

2. Morning Breath

Tired man lying in bed stretching and yawning in an effort to wake up as he debates just turning over and going back to sleep in the morning

Nearly everyone has it, especially if you can be hasty in your nightly dental routine or forget to brush entirely. One of the best ways to prevent morning breath is to scrape your tongue before bed. Most bacteria that breeds overnight when the mouth is closed for up to 8 hours, and overall oral bacteria in general, can be found on the tongue. Another tip is to swish coconut oil before bed. It sounds strange, but this is actually an ancient practice known as oil pulling.

For about 15-20 minutes, swish around a tablespoon of organic pressed coconut oil and do not swallow it! It is said to “catch” bacteria and toxins in a disposable trap more effectively than an alcohol based mouthwash. For real life testimonies and the exact science, research oil pulling online. You will be astounded!

3. Halitosis

Lastly, the peskiest form of bad breath is known as Halitosis; a chronic condition that is persistent despite brushing and flossing. The cause can be trickier to locate, as there are many possibilities. If you are brushing and flossing consistently and it is not making a difference, chances are it is a problem you may have to consult a dentist about. Chronic bad breath can usually be traced back to two very broad categories: poor dental hygiene (at some point in your life), poor diet – and sometimes, both. When your daily oral regimen (brushing flossing, and rinsing) is not totally thorough on a regular basis (like remembering to brush, yet never flossing), it can lead to all kinds of dysfunction in the mouth that needs to be treated by a dentist: gum disease, cavity, tooth decay – all of which can be prevented. Diets high in sugar and carbohydrates, sugary and carbonated drinks, as well as habitual tobacco use can be the cause of most oral ailments especially when made a practice. In fact, most people that use tobacco products daily have bad breath, and if they do not have oral health issues now, chances are they will later in life! Remember to moderate your alcohol, soda, and tobacco use to only special occasions.

A healthy diet and lifestyle benefits your whole body, which includes your mouth. If you believe you may have halitosis, consult your dentist and they will be able to locate certain stages of decay or gum disease. They can also give you tips to improve your habits and specific diet changes you can make.

Overall, remember to visit your dentist twice a year, and to brush twice daily – because breath mints won’t always cut it!

Fun Facts About Your Smile

(Please note all facts have been taken from other online sources)

  • Tooth enamel is the hardest substance in the human body. (But that doesn’t mean we should use our teeth to open lids or packaging!)

 

  • It takes 43 muscles to frown, but only 17 to smile.

 

  • Babies in the womb start developing teeth under their gums at six weeks gestation. That’s amazing!

 

  • 78% of Americans have had their first cavity by age 17.

 

  • 51 million school hours and 164 work hours per year are lost because of dental related illness. It goes to show that brushing 2 minutes in the morning and 2 minutes at night can save a lot more time and money down the road!

 

  • There is more bacteria in a human mouth than there are people on the earth.

 

  • Kids only have 20 teeth, but adults have 32 teeth.

 

  • It is incredibly rare, but a baby can actually be born with teeth already broken through the surface of their gums.

 

  • On average, women smile 62 times a day, where the average man only smiles 8! Kids smile up to 400 times a day. Smiling relieves stress because it releases endorphins in your brain, which in turn can boost your immune system and prevent sickness!

 

  • Wisdom teeth are so named because they come in when one is “older and wiser.” 35% of people are born without them!

 

  • More people use blue toothbrushes than red ones.

 

  • 47% of people report that the first thing they notice about someone is their smile.

 

  • The tooth from an elephant can weigh up to six pounds!

 

  • The tooth is the only part of the body that cannot repair itself.

 

  • Are you left handed or right handed? Left handed people tend to chew on the left side of their mouth, while right handed people tend to chew on their right hand side

 

  • 90% of life threatening conditions have oral related symptoms. This is why it is said that flossing regularly can extend your life expectancy up to six years!

Laughing twins on the gray background

 

  • Just like fingerprints, no two people have the same exact set of teeth or tongue print. Even identical twins have different teeth!

 

  • Saliva has so many purposes. If our mouths were completely dry, we would not be able to distinguish the taste of anything.

 

  • It was common practice in the middle ages to kiss a donkey to cure a toothache.

 

  • The first bristles on toothbrushes were said to be made from cow hairs. Good thing modern day toothbrushes have nylon brushes!

 

  • When you choose to just brush and not floss, that means you are only cleaning two thirds of your tooth surface. Imagine if we only cleaned two thirds of our bodies! That could get pretty yucky over time!

 

  • You produce enough saliva in your lifetime to fill 2 swimming pools – up to 25,000 quarts!

 

  • In Italy and France, they do not have a “Toothy Fairy”, but a “Tooth Mouse.” Imagine putting a tooth under your pillow to await the Tooth Mouse!
Teeth Whitening: What You Need to Know
Teeth Whitening: What You Need to Know

Do you long for beautiful, pearly white teeth? Personal habits such as coffee drinking or tobacco use can cause discoloration over time. It’s no wonder that teeth whitening agents have become so popular. This can be a procedure performed by a professional, or as simple as using whitening strips at home. However, have you ever experienced pain while using them?

Most of us have probably heard some not-so-great, or downright scary stories about teeth whitening! However, despite popular misconception, most whitening products have not been deemed officially dangerous by professionals. Regardless, people with sensitive teeth should use caution. It has been reported that the chemicals in teeth whitening products can be harmful if left on for too long. This is because agents such as chlorine dioxide can wear down tooth enamel in the process of removing stains. This causes the nerve to be more exposed; which leads to heightened sensitivity and ultimately pain. While enamel can be reinforced with calcium agents in our diet and certain enamel toothpastes, a tooth remains the only part of the body that cannot fully repair itself.

This may go without saying, but teeth whitening agents are never recommended for little ones and kids who still have baby teeth (12 and under). As adult teeth tend to discolor over the decades, baby teeth should have no problem sparkling as long as they are taken care of! If you have found that your child’s chompers are looking a bit off-color, chances are they are not disciplined in taking care of their teeth by brushing twice and flossing daily. Permanent correction such as whitening should only be conducted with permanent teeth.

Chemical-Free Ways to Whiten Teeth

  1. The dentist: sometimes all you need is a good deep-clean! Your twice yearly dental visit can clear off build-up of plaque in certain areas and polish teeth in ways department store toothpaste cannot. After your dentist visits, really make sure to be strict about flossing and rinsing daily and see if you notice a difference long-term. For an even stronger effect using this process, purchase whitening mouthwash, used to brighten teeth (not recommended for children!)
  2. Oil-pulling: an ancient practice, beneficial in countless ways; one of them being teeth whitening! Using organic coconut oil, swish a tablespoon in your mouth for 20 minutes a day. This is a chemical-free way for layers of plaque to be broken down as oils have anti-fungal and antibacterial properties. It also acts as a trap to pull and collect bacteria. (Don’t have 20 minutes? Try it while in the shower or answering emails. It goes by very quickly!)
  3. Sugar-free gum with xylitol: chewing gum increases saliva production which cleanses your teeth of bacteria. As we clench down, it can also get those hard-to-reach places, a bit like flossing does.
  4. An apple a day: a cliche that is nevertheless true! Apples can be beneficial to our teeth as well, because their flesh fibers can act as little toothbrushes in our mouths, washing away plaque and brightening teeth. Research also shows that celery has a similar effect.

One last note:

If you have sensitive teeth and are hesitant about using a whitening product, and have attempted these home remedies to no avail, discuss options with your dentist. There may be a particular product he or she would recommend that would be best for your teeth and your level of staining. Dentists know best!

Image by Davisdentalcare (Own work) via Wikimedia Commons

Cavity Prevention for You & Your Kids
Cavity Prevention for You & Your Kids

As much as we love our patients at the Kidds Place, visiting the dentist for a filling can be uncomfortable! Luckily there are more specific ways to keep your teeth healthy and clean besides the obvious. We have all heard it before: brush twice daily, floss, go to the dentist, and do not eat too much sugar. It sounds simple, but does it truly guarantee a filling-free mouth? Every mouth is different, and even the best brushers can still experience decay. But there’s more steps you can take towards cavity prevention for a lifelong healthy smile.

How Does a Cavity Even Form?

Cavities are formed when plaque buildup weakens the tooth enamel, causing it to soften. Plaque is a sticky substance that forms on teeth when sugar from food has been solidified over a period of time by the bacteria in our mouths. Enamel is a natural hard coating of the tooth made up of minerals such as calcium. If the plaque sticking to the surface of the enamel is not brushed away, it begins to eat away at it. When this occurs, acids begin to penetrate and diminish the tooth itself, causing the dark or black spot where decay has occurred. This is called a cavity because it is a literal chasm that has formed in the tooth itself. It is recommended that children as well as adults receive a teeth cleaning twice yearly. These remove plaque build-up and keep teeth polished and smooth. However, here are some measures you and your family can take outside of the dentist chair.

Foods to Avoid & Foods to Eat

What is the common phrase? “Don’t eat too much sugar, or your teeth will rot!” While it’s true that excess sugar can harm your teeth, there is little point trying to scare kids out of eating sugar so they wont have to “go to the dentist and get a shot”, because while sugar can cause plaque, so can anything high in carbohydrates. This is because all carbs are eventually broken down into simple sugars, such as glucose and fructose. The solution is simply ensuring that plaque formed from these types of food is properly removed, so no permanent damage can be done to teeth.

While we are all taught to moderate certain foods, did you know there are foods that actually help strengthen your enamel? Any foods rich in calcium – milk, cheese, yogurt, can make the enamel stronger and therefore develop a thicker shield against cavities.

Eat apples! It is said that they can actually clean your teeth. The fleshy fibers found in the white of the apple can act as tiny little “toothbrushes” that scrub at your teeth as you chew. It goes to show that “an apple a day” can keep the dentist away too! (Although, don’t skip out on your twice yearly cleaning). If your kids like celery, it too is known to have a similar effect!

Drink lots of water. Most water systems in the U.S. contain fluoride – one of the minerals commonly used to strengthen teeth. What is more, drinking water ultimately produces more saliva, which can wash away bacteria in the mouth between brushing.

Develop a Daily Dental Hygiene Regimen Dental care

Dentists recommend brushing for two minutes, twice daily – once in the morning and once at night. If your child likes to be speedy and brushes too quickly, practice setting a timer for 2 minutes to ensure they reach every area of their mouth. Remember also that if kids cannot yet tie their shoes, studies show that they have not yet developed the coordination or strength to brush their teeth on their own.

Flossing and rinsing with mouthwash every day can seem like a lot, but try to develop the habit of flossing with the morning brushing, and rinsing with the evening brushing. Floss can reach the pesky plaque that a toothbrush can not – in fact, did you know brushing only cleans two-thirds of our teeth? Floss gets between and cleans the one-third a toothbrush cannot. Imagine if you went your whole life without flossing! There would always be a third of your teeth that never got cleaned. To round it off, mouthwash kills excess bacteria all over the mouth, not just teeth, but gums, tongue, cheeks and roof of mouth where germs can also spread. Using all three can help your kids to be cavity free!

How Often Should I Replace My Toothbrush?
How Often Should I Replace My Toothbrush?

There are two types of toothbrushes on the market today – manual and electric. While there are benefits to both, the brushes themselves can wear out and accumulate bacteria. Manual brushing enables full control from the amount of pressure and movements applied to teeth, which perhaps an electric toothbrush cannot allow because of its rapid and mechanical vibrations. The benefits of electric toothbrushes are quite obvious; when in use, the bristles are able to do more than a regular toothbrush, such as massaging gums and pulsating in between the tight cracks between our teeth, giving us that “straight-from-the-dentist” clean feeling.

Whether you prefer this modern way of dental hygiene or a more traditional, inexpensive method, our teeth still take their toll on these devices and wear them out. What’s more, some researchers show that 10 million germs can be living in our toothbrush! A toothbrush can become a breeding grounds for harmful bacteria if it is not properly stored.

For best results, most experts say to replace your toothbrush every three months (if you use an electric, that means replacing the “head”, or the attachment of the toothbrush). Children may need to replace theirs more frequently because they tend to apply more pressure when brushing. Kids may grow attached to their toothbrush (especially if it has their favorite Disney character on it!) but once the bristles start to bend outwards, dentists say the toothbrush is no longer effective, and should be thrown away.

funny little girl in pyjamas with tooth brush

Care of Your Toothbrush & Good Habits to Form

Because the bristles of our toothbrush wear out so quickly, the American Dental Association recommends rinsing your toothbrush under the faucet between brushings to wash away saliva and toothpaste residue, and to store it upright so the bristles can air dry. If you’re a parent that is extra cautious of bacteria, soak it in rubbing alcohol when not in use, then rinse with water thoroughly.

It can be a difficult task to keep track of how long it has been since each toothbrush in the house has been replaced, especially if you have more than one kid! But remember that your child will receive a new brush with each dentist visit, and these visits occur (at the very least) every 6 months for cleaning. That means you only have to replace it once again, somewhere along the midpoint, between each visit.

*Tip: Instead of remembering to put them on the shopping list every so often, keep your bathroom cupboard or closet stocked with unopened toothbrushes. (Many stores have value packs you can purchase which contain several in a pack). This will make the transitions more convenient for you and your family.   

 

Caring for Your Tongue: Why you Should Clean your Tongue and How
Caring for Your Tongue: Why you Should Clean your Tongue and How

While brushing and flossing alone reduces the amount of bacteria in your mouth, did you know that over 50% of oral bacteria sit on your tongue? This bacteria is often responsible for bad breath and can also contribute to tooth decay, so properly removing it can greatly reduce the occurrence and keep breath fresh, for much longer. Caring for your tongue is just as important as the teeth and gums, so don’t leave it behind!

Why it’s important

The mouth is one of the main gateways for pathogens into your body and is also the beginning of your digestive tract. Your tongue is actually the first organ of digestion, aiding food down the esophagus as you swallow. It is also a mode of detoxification and is part of the first line of immune defense. Since up to half of oral bacteria can sit on your tongue, if you’re only brushing teeth and gums, you are leaving behind quite a bit of bacteria in your mouth as well as swallowing some of it, sending it back into your body. Bacteria isn’t the only thing on your tongue either. Food debris and dead skin cells often find their home on the surface of your tongue.

Bacteria buildup on the tongue can begin to look quite obvious. Have you ever noticed a coating on your tongue or that of your child’s? This coating is an accumulation of mostly bacteria and toxins from the body’s cleansing and detoxifying process. During sleep, the body works to eliminate toxins and waste in your system, some of which deposit on the surface of your tongue. This is often why you can see this coating primarily in the morning.

Kids generally have pretty clean, pink tongues.  As we get older though, we consistently develop this coating on the back of the tongue which can vary in color from yellow, white or even orange. Breast or bottle fed babies can also develop a coating as well.

When this coating isn’t removed, not only can we reabsorb the bacteria and toxins, but it often results in bad breath, increased risk for cavities and gum disease. This coating also Keeping your mouth and tongue clean is not only important to your oral health, but also that of your digestive and immune health.

 

Why buy a scraper?

Dental research has long concluded that scrapers are far more effective at removing bacteria and toxins than a toothbrush. Tongue scrapers are uniquely shaped to fit in the back of the mouth, where the coating generally accumulates the thickest. They are made of metal in a long, flat, and thin “U” shape. It is designed for ease of use and to clean more thoroughly than scrubbing with a toothbrush. Many modern toothbrushes are designed with raised rubber or plastic scrapers on the backside of the bristle head as well.Tongue scraper

You may also use the edge of a metal spoon or the backside of a butter knife. Using a toothbrush to scrub the tongue not only takes far more time and work to accomplish, but is also quite prone to cause gagging, which no one is too fond of, and can be difficult to clean out of the bristles. You can find scrapers at most health stores or drug stores in the oral hygiene section.

 

How to do it

Scraping is best done daily before brushing and flossing in the morning hours, say, after breakfast before you brush and floss for the day.

  • Whether you are doing this yourself or you are doing so for your child, with a scraper in both hands, hold out your tongue or ask you child to and gently press the scraper on the tongue and pull lightly in a downward motion, but enough to pull the coating off. Repeat as needed until the tongue is clean and clear.
  • Rinse the scraper and store in a clean place.
  • If you are using a built-in toothbrush scraper, a spoon, or butter knife edge, you may need to repeat several times to cover the surface of the tongue.

 

Immunity: Remember The 4-S’s of Health!
Immunity: Remember The 4-S’s of Health!

Immunity, we know why we need it

The human body has an incredible defense system that works systematically to keep foreign invaders and nasty illnesses at bay. The immune system is this line of defense, but there are really several systems that play a role in your body’s immunity. Like just about everything, the immune system isn’t perfect and it can fail, and often does for some. There are many health conditions that can weaken immunity, along with poor health and lifestyle habits.
At this time of year, illness is much more common and frequent. The idea of boosting your immunity with this supplement or that drink mix seems enticing and makes a great marketing tool, however, we need to understand that the immune system is a bit more complex, as it isn’t a single function, but rather exactly as it is named: a system. For the immune defense of your body to do it’s job well, it needs balance and harmony. The immune system is made up of a network of cells, tissues, and organs that all need to be in good health in order to contribute their role in keeping you healthy and thriving. In this article, we hope to help you understand that immunity “boosting” is really a lifestyle and that some of these tips can help you make wise choices for your family healthy and wellness this season. Keep reading!

Sleep is not overrated!sleep for immunity

We were all born with the basic, physiological need for sleep, and for a great reason, without it, our bodies will shut down. It is common knowledge that a lack of sleep, especially on a regular basis, contributes to a box-full of health problems.Tests and studies have found that lack of sleep causes an inflammatory response which can then lead to an array of problems in itself. Also, it has been found that adequate sleep is critical to training the immune system’s response following vaccinations. Have you ever noticed that one of the symptoms of illness, with just about every kind you can get, is sleepiness? This is because our immune system is informing the brain to sleep more in order to strengthen itself to fend off the infection. Sleep is strength, and for many reasons, we need it! aim for 7-8 hours of sleep per night, and for kids, 9-10. Luckily, with our shorter hours of daylight and fewer activities due to weather, this can more easily be done!

Sugar is sweet, but it isn’t nice!

Sugar is something we all know by now isn’t good for us, but do you know why? Let’s talk in regards to immunity, because we could be here all day with this one. Sugar can reduce your immunity up to 40% for about 7-8 hours following a moderate consumption. That’s quite a blow! Sugar seems to be squeezed into a large amount of our food products, so be careful about what you eat and start incorporating more fruits, but even more vegetables and proteins into your family diet. One of the best ways to incorporate more vegetables would be in soups, perfect for this time of year. Beans, onions, carrots, celery, spinach, kale, potatoes, sweet potatoes, etc. Make a big pot of soup with bone broth, garlic, seasonings, beans, rice, noodles, different meats… you get the idea!
For breakfast, you can make bowls of oatmeal and top with diced fruits and yogurt. Avoid breakfast cereals since they contain a lot of added sugar, not to mention the sugar content in milk combined. Though a natural, digestible and useable sugar, fruit is still sugar so try to limit your daily amount. If you get a sweet tooth, opt for naturally sweetened foods and try some of your own recipes at home and use less sugar than the measured amount. There are many great options for reducing sugar consumption and making healthier choices without opting for “no sugar” processed options which contain artificial sweeteners. Pinterest is a great tool for finding such recipes!

Sweat is a method of detox!exercise

Exercise is a key player in building and maintaining your immune army. Sweating is one way the body eliminates toxins from the body, of those we eat, drink, and breath. Exercise is vital for so many reasons, but especially in immune function since movement promotes the circulation of lymph, also part of the immune system. Lymph moves rather slowly and requires movement to get going. Get your kids going by taking them to the park while the weather is tolerable, or take them to some indoor parks or gyms so they can move around with you. Aim for about 30 minutes a day, or even several times a week at the least.

Supplements

There is no supplement for a poor diet, plain and simple. You are what you eat, as commonly said. Start by implementing a lot of plant foods, whole grains and proteins. Dark, leafy greens contain a lot of minerals and vitamins including magnesium, which is vital for bone and muscle health. It can be tough to get kids to eat vegetables, but soups might be your golden ticket here! While a good diet is a pillar to good health, sometimes we need help getting all the necessary nutrients our bodies need. This is where high quality supplements can be useful and sometimes necessary. It is always advised to seek medical advice on what supplements are needed for your family members, so please see your doctor.
Vitamin D – In our area of the Northwest, people are generally deficient in Vitamin D, most of the year. There is very little in food and there are only two ways we can get it, from the sun and from supplementation. Our bodies cannot produce it. As a fat soluble vitamin that can build up in the system, consult your doctor about yours and your family’s level and supplement accordingly.
Vitamin C – For immunity, Vitamin C is quite well known for getting over illness more quickly. Many vegetables such as colored peppers, oranges, kiwis, broccoli, and tomatoes are high in vitamin C. Orange juice isn’t a great source since it contains high amounts of sugar and is commonly made from concentrate, not real juice. If you can find real juice with no additional sugar, moderation is key!
Probiotics – are necessary for gut health, which makes up about 70% of our immune system! Good and bad bacteria are both present in the colon and need to remain balanced for good health. Taking a probiotic can keep the balance and eliminate some of this bad bacteria which improves the overall health and immune response of your body. Talk to your doctor about what probiotics are good for you and your kids.supplements and food

As a parent, the healthy of our kids is always a forethought, especially now that fall is here and cold weather is settling in. While working on these 4 S’s is a good practice for improved health, all year, it isn’t a guarantee for a sick-free season. We still get sick, but when you do and your health is relatively good, chances of remaining sick are far less! Stay tuned for our next article about some habits you can teach your kids to stay healthy and happy at school!

Dental Care for Asthmatic Children
Dental Care for Asthmatic Children

Asthma and What it Means for Oral Health

Asthma affects around 1 of 10 children, and those numbers seem to be climbing in recent years. Patients with asthma taking medications have an increased risk of cavities, bad breath, and gum problems since they tend to be mouth breathers. Medications such as corticosteroids can reduce saliva flow, causing a dry mouth which further causes the bad breath. Since saliva has a cleansing effect in the mouth, ashtmatic children can then be more susceptible to cavities. If thorough and consistent care isn’t taken, this could then lead to gum disease. With this, it is important to remain under routine dental care and regular visits if your child has asthma and requires medication. Dental care does stay relatively the same, depending on the severity of your child’s condition and their triggers for asthmatic attacks. Asthma is categorized as mild, moderate, or severe, based partially on the regularity and intensity of symptoms during daytime, exercise resistance, and symptoms during night-time.The goal in managing a patient with asthma is to prevent an acute asthmatic episode during the routine cleanings or other dental procedures such as fillings. When you visit the dentist, be sure to let the hygienists and the dentist know about current medications, changes in the doses or frequency, and your child’s triggers for attacks.

Preparing Your Child for Their Visit asthma medication

We know that dental visits should start at the first eruption of a baby tooth. Cultivating a positive relationship with your child’s dentist is not only vital for every child, but especially those with asthma since anxiety of others is a common cause for asthma episodes. Studies have proven that the most important factor in overcoming dental anxiety is good dentist-patient communication. So, how can you help your child overcome and work through anxiety?

  • Schedule the appointment for the morning, while they are alert but still relaxed and before any events of the day might cause stress. If your child seems more relaxed in the afternoon, by all means schedule for the time that is most comfortable and accommodating for you and your child.
  • Give yourself ample time for the appointment, don’t schedule on a day you might be rushed.
  • Give your child a higher protein breakfast which has a calming effect. Avoid sugary foods such as cereal and pancakes with syrup.
  • If your child needs asthma medication prior to the appointment, encourage them to drink some water to minimize the effect of it on their teeth. This would also be a good routine practice.
  • Bring your child’s inhaler to the appointment in the event your child has an attack. Better to have it and not need it!
  • Bring earplugs if excessive noise might be a problem and your child is comfortable with them. We also have head phones in our office for noise
  • Distractions.  Our staff is well trained in keeping children distracted from the procedure. If you have something your child would be well distracted with such as a stuffed animal or picture, bring it with you!
  • Encourage your child to take deep breaths if this is okay for them or as much as they are able. Have them breath with you.
  • Listen to some fun music they like in the car on the way to the appointment.
  • Reassure your child that the dentist help their teeth stay strong and healthy!

 

In preparation for your appointment and to keep your child’s thoughts positive about dental care, also try to avoid conversations with others who fear the dentist or who had bad experiences with the dentist. Keep positive reinforcement going and let your child form their own opinion about visiting the dentist according to their own experience. Along with preparing your child for their visit to the dentist, we ask that you would prepare the dentists and hygienists as well! Of course, depending on the severity of your child’s asthma, be prepared with the following information:

What your Dentist Needs to Know Positive experience at the dentist

  • First, let your dentist know about the asthma prior to the appointment and upon arrival. Include information about when they were diagnosed and the severity of it
  • Give your child water to drink before the appointment to help cleanse their mouth.
  • Tell your dentist about medications they are currently taking and how often, how much
  • Explain how you handle asthma attacks and your child’s common triggers and the time of the last attack.
  • Explain your oral care routine of your child’s teeth
  • Keep the office updated about medication changes or condition changes so that care can be altered accordingly

Tips on caring for your child’s teeth

Between appointments, there are some tips we have for you to maintain your child’s oral health and some things to keep in mind. Depending on the kind of medication  your child needs to manage asthma symptoms, it is very important to give your child water immediately after taking the medication. The mouth is the fist to have contact with medication and that is the reason for the higher risk of dental complications. Water will reduce the amount of medication that sits on the teeth and will have the cleansing effect that might be missing from decreased saliva production.

Brushing teeth regularly is a must as some dry powder inhalants contain some sugar in order to make the medication tolerable. We know that sugar is quite destructive to the enamel and the surface of the tooth, so frequent brushing is needed. Also, depending on the frequency of medication, it might be advised to have your child brush three times daily.

 

While dental care may not be too different for children with asthma as it is for those who do not, it is a condition that your dentist will need to know about in detail in order to reduce the likelihood of an attack during routine visits. Keeping your dentist updated about your child’s physical well being and emotional state regarding the dental chair will further help us to help you and keep those smiles bright!

 

Sunscreen/sunblock: the difference and what you should know for your health

happy kid in the sunSunlight is both beneficial and hazardous to our skin. Sunshine aids vitamin D absorption and helps boost and energize your mood! It can also burn your skin and lead to cancer later in life without proper protection. With the skin being the largest organ of your body and the most sun-exposed, sun protection is crucial for everyone, particularly during the summer months, but year round is necessary depending on your lifestyle.

We know how important sun protection is, but how can you know which products are safe and suitable for your family? While you can enjoy some fun in the sun, let’s be smart about it this summer!

WHAT YOU SEE, WHAT YOU GET

The sun emits two kinds of rays, UVA and UVB, or Ultra Violet rays. Type A is a long wave ray which penetrates deeper into the skin causing spots, wrinkles, and premature aging. UVA rays are present year round and are more abundant than UVB rays.  Type B rays are shorter wave rays which cause burn and tan on the skin. UVB rays are also more intense during midday, summertime months, at higher altitudes, and closer to the equator. This type also assists the body in making vitamin D.  

Sun protection comes in two forms: chemical and physical. Physical sunblock deflects UV rays while chemical sunscreen absorbs into the skin, thus absorbing and scattering the rays. SPF (sun protection factor) is also a key player in sun protection; with numbers ranging from about 15 spf to 100.

SUNBLOCK

Sunblock incorporates physical ingredients that actually block the sun, both UVA and UVB. It is usually a much more dense lotion than a sunscreen. The main active ingredients should be minerals known as Titanium Dioxide or Zinc Oxide, or both combined. Zinc oxide is also the main ingredient in diaper rash cream and is soothing to the skin.

Sunblock might be a better option for your family if you have a member with sensitive skin or for babies, because zinc oxide and titanium dioxide are less irritating than other ingredients found in sunscreen. Sunblocks can leave a white cast, due to the opaque nature of the minerals, and could be a bit more difficult to apply since they are thick. Combining with a lotion can help with the application.

SUNSCREEN

Blocking the SunSunscreen consists of chemicals which absorb into the skin and absorb UVA and UVB rays. Because of the absorption dependency, sunscreen needs to be applied 20 minutes before sun exposure to become effective, as specified on the bottle. Some of the most common chemical sunscreen ingredients include: Octylcrylene, Avobenzone, Octinoxate, Octisalate, Oxybenzone, Homosalate, and Helioplex.

Sunscreen is usually runny and less opaque, applying fairly clear. Sunscreens are also available in aerosol sprays. Chemical sunscreens can cause irritation and are more prone to cause allergic reactions, so be sure to test a small spot on your child’s inner elbow.

Sunscreens are easily applied and can offer longer protection.Sun block and sunscreen are often combined for both topical in internal sun protection benefits.

SPF

SPF numbers can often be a determining factor in choosing a sunscreen. SPF ratings measure the time you can remain in the sunlight before burning with sunscreen on, compared to being without it. When looking for an SPF, look for one that is also water resistant, as most are today. Sunscreen should still be reapplied ever 1-2 hours for optimal protection since no sunscreen is fully waterproof or sweat proof.

Looking at the numbers can be a bit confusing, but don’t get caught up on what number might be best. Higher SPF doesn’t mean more protection than lower SPF, nor does it mean you can go longer periods of time before reapplying.  Lower SPF can give just as much protection as a higher SPF, for example, SPF 30 blocks about 97% of rays while an SPF 50 will block about 98%. Choose a sunscreen no lower than SPF 30 and no higher than SPF 50.

Source: http://www.skincancer.org/skin-cancer-information/ask-the-experts/does-a-higher-spf-sunscreen-always-protect-your-skin-better

Broad Spectrum

Be sure to look for a sun pretection product that is braod spectrum, meaning that it guards against both UVA and UVB rays. Zinc oxide in sunscreens and sunblocks alike is one of the best and most potent forms for blocking UVA rays. Choose one that contains at Zinc oxide alongside Titanium dioxide or other chemical sunscreens.

Vitamin D deficiency and how much time is okay without skin protection:

The body needs vitamin D to absorb phosphorus and calcium from food. These minerals are essential for healthy bones and organ function. Short periods of sun exposure (about 10 to 15 minutes for people with lighter skin). daily with no sunscreen amid the summer months (April to October) are adequate for most individuals to make sufficient vitamin D. Studies suggest that the most productive time of day for vitamin D to be produced is between 11am and 3pm.

Nano-particles (mineral sunblock)

Nano-particles refer to the particle size of the minerals zinc oxide and titanium dioxide. In terms of diameter, fine particles cover a range between 100 and 2500 nanometers, while ultra-fine particles are sized between 1 and 100 nanometers.

The smaller the particle size is, the superior the SPF protection is. Nano particles are used primarily to eliminate the thick white cast that is often an inconvenience with mineral sunblocks as well as provide lasting protection. While this may seem like a good choice, studies are finding that nanoparticles are small enough to penetrate cell membranes, rendering them potentially harmful.

While it is still in debate, minerals in sunblock should be non-nano particles. Non-nano means that the particle size of the minerals is larger than the skin pore, allowing it only to sit on the skin surface.

  • Which type (chemical/physical) is best for babies, kids, and different ages and activities?

It’s recommended to choose a physical (or chemical-free) sunscreen which contains zinc oxide or titanium dioxide. Also, its recommended to limit sun exposure for babies under 6 months. When that’s not possible, protect your baby’s skin with sunblock and a beach hat.

SPF

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • How much should you apply?

To ensure that you get the full protection of a sunscreen, you need to apply at least 1 oz for your body – about a shot glass full. Most people apply only half to a quarter of that amount, which means the actual SPF they have on their body is lower than the advertised amount, which also means less protection. During a long day at the beach, one person should use around one half to one quarter of an 8 oz. bottle, that is quite a bit!

Apply your sunscreen about 30 minutes before heading outside to allow time for it to bind or absorb into your skin. Reapply at least ever 2 hours and every hour for intense activity that causes perspiration. Apply immediately after swimming.

Protecting ourselves from the damage of the sun is more important today than every before. The UV radiation is more intense today than in years past, so be sure to grab your sun protection of choice, stay hydrated, and wear protective, breathable clothing when you head outside! We hope this information about sun protection products can help you chose the best option for your family.